Email Glossary

BIMI

  • Brand Indicators for Message Identification (BIMI) is a technology that is built on top of DMARC that helps brands display their trademark logos in the Inbox. Gmail displays a blue check mark for BIMI-enabled senders. It helps build trust in the recipient's mind.

Bounce

  • Bounce is a delivery failure. If an email is not accepted by the recipient server, it is called a bounce. There can be two types of bounces: soft and hard.

Deferrals

  • This is an intermittent state between Sent, Delivered, and Bounced - where the emails are rejected by the Internet Service Providers (ISPs), but the delivery is re-attempted by the Email Service Providers (ESPs). The number and time frame of re-tries vary between ESPs. Deferrals mainly occur because either the emails were sent too fast or the recipient server was busy. Deferred emails either end up getting delivered or get bounced.

Dedicated IP

  • If an IP is reserved for sending emails for just one domain, it is called a dedicated IP.

DKIM

  • Domain Keys Identified Email (DKIM) is an email authentication method designed to detect if an email has been tampered with.

DMARC

  • Domain-based Message Authentication Reporting & Conformance (DMARC) is an email authentication and reporting policy that is built on top of SPF and DKIM. DMARC instructs the ISP on how to handle an email that fails the DKIM and SPF checks. Strict DMARC policies ensure that spammers are unable to impersonate you.

Domain

  • If your emails are sent from, MyBrand <xyz@anything.mybrand.com>, your from domain would be anything.mybrand.com which is essentially a subdomain of mybrand.com.

Domain reputation

  • This is a value assigned to any domain by Internet Service Providers (ISPs) based on their assessment of emails originating from that domain. A higher or better reputation increases the chances of emails landing in the inbox. With a lower reputation, there are high chances of emails being placed in spam.

Email Deliverability

  • Email deliverability is the measure of emails that went to recipients' Inboxes. There is no way to calculate email deliverability as mailbox providers do not share if they sent the emails to inbox or spam. Proxy indicators of deliverability include Domain and IP reputation, Campaign Performance Metrics (delivered, open, click, complaints, unsubscribe), and Inbox placement rate.

Email Suppression

  • This is a list of users who are excluded from receiving emails despite being target users. Typically these are the users who have unsubscribed from your communication, reported your emails as spam, or whose email address does not exist.

Feedback Loop

  • Feedback loop (FBL) or complaint feedback loop is a service offered by ISPs such as Yahoo, Microsoft, Comcast, Mail.ru, etc., wherein they forward the email complaints made by their recipients to the feedback address. The feedback address has to be added and verified during FBL registration.
  • Note: Google does not share the details of users as a part of FBL. Only spam complaints percentage can be viewed on the Google Postmaster tool if a Feedback ID header is included in your emails while sending.

From email Address

  • If your emails are sent from, MyBrand <xyz@anything.mybrand.com>, your From email Address would be xyz@anything.mybrand.com.

IP Address

  • The IP address is the identifier of the email server from where your emails will be sent. These are assigned to your accounts with the ESPs at the time of onboarding.

IP reputation

  • This is a value assigned to any IP by the ISPs based on their assessment of emails originating from that IP. A higher or better reputation increases the chances of emails landing in the inbox. With a lower reputation, emails are highly likely to be placed in spam.

Inbox placement

  • Inbox placement is the percentage of emails that are likely to have landed in the recipient's Inbox. ISPs do not share this information directly, so there's no way to confidently determine this. However, third-party tools like eDataSource, Inbox Monster, Validity, EmailConsul, Kickbox, and so on., share approximate Inbox placement rates based on the results of Seed Testing.

Hard Bounce

  • If the bounce is permanent in nature, it's called a hard bounce. It typically happens in scenarios where the recipient's domain doesn't exist or has been permanently disabled, or the recipient's email address does not exist or has been permanently disabled.

Pre-warmed IP

  • IPs that have an assigned reputation are called as warmed IPs. In the parlance of email campaigns, pre-warmed indicates that you would not need to undertake IP-warming activities.

Sender Name

  • If your emails are sent from, MyBrand <xyz@anything.mybrand.com>, your Sender Name would be MyBrand.

Shared IP

  • If a common IP is used to send emails for more than one domain, it is called a shared IP.

Soft Bounce

  • If the bounce is temporary in nature, it's called a soft bounce. It typically happens in scenarios where the recipient's mailbox is full, the recipient's mail server is busy, the sender's IPs are blocked, and so on.

SPF

  • Sender Policy Framework(SPF) is an email authentication method that helps validate if the IP from where the mail has originated is authorized to send emails from that (mailed-by) domain.
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